Catching Up On The Grand Union

The best place to catch up is to start where we left off!

Week last Thursday (9th August)

We left our Ditchford FOTRN mooring on the Nene fairly early for us.

We’d booked to stay the night at White Mills Marina, a promise we made when we’d previously stayed at the marina on our way to the Ouse. We were in need of topping the diesel tank, using the sanny service, and to off load our growing rubbish mountain. A huge Tesco order had also been booked for delivery at the Marina.

The weather forecast advised us that rain was on the way again, and with having 6 locks to go through before we get to the marina at the anticipated time of 2pm, an early start was planned.

With the recent heavy rain, sailing out of the locks was a bit of a nightmare as there was a gentle flow on the river due to the recent rains, the flow had washed downstream a huge amount of weed, which had congregated at the top lock gates.

Just as we were going through White Mills Lock, our last lock of the day, the heavens opened. As fast as we could, while at the same time manoeuvring the tight marina entrance, and going dead slow in the marina, we reached the service jetty where we were helped to temporarily moor. The staff took cover from the rain while we battened down our hatches, and waited for the violent thunderstorm to pass.

When the storm had passed, our diesel tank was brimmed, together with sanny and rubbish duties carried out, an empty gas bottle was exchanged for a full one, and we were helped by obliging staff to our overnight mooring.

Saturday (10/11th August)

Our Tesco delivery arrived on time, though it took quite a while finding space in Cyan for all our delivery.

Looking at the weather forecast, we thought it best to stay another night in the marina. The weather forecast was once again spot on; only this time hailstones was added to the mix of thunder, lightening, and torrential rain.

Sunday (12th August)

Waking up to a fine sunny day, we’d planned to travel through five locks, and hopefully stop on the 48 hr EA mooring just after Weston Favell Lock Flood Gates.

This is a great mooring for Rusty as there’s a park alongside the mooring where he could have a good run.

Monday (13th August)

Not a good day weatherwise, and it was an easy decision to stop on our mooring one more night. By the afternoon the rain clouds had passed over, and it was quite a pleasant afternoon. We were tempted, despite windy conditions, to continue our journey. In the end we plumed for a good start in the morning, and perhaps even climb the 17 Northampton Arm locks, including the Rotherthorpe Flight.

Tuesday (14th August)

A sharp start to the much calmer day, saw us leaving our mooring before breakfast around 7:30 a.m.

We had 3 locks to go through before we reached Northamption Junction, and the end of the Nene.

Just after we’d gone through Rush Mills Lock, once again the heavens opened. We found a spare gap on the EA mooring before Northampton Lock, where we had a good breakfast while we waited for the rain to stop. Luckily it wasn’t long after breakfast that the sun came out, and we were once again on our way.

After Northampton Lock, my lock duties had been completed! It was now John’s turn to work the locks, and the first one, Cotton Lock no.17, took us onto CRT waters.

The journey through the Norhampton Arm was fraught trying to avoid the weeds, but the crystal clear water was fabulous. There’s a huge stock of fish in the canal, and it was fascinating to watch them swim about, some were quite big too.

At the last two locks we were helped by a CRT employee. Luckily we were in time, though we hadn’t realised there was a ‘curfew’ on the locks. The flight of locks are being padlocked between 6:00 pm, and 9:00 am, due to water shortage. See CRT Information.

It had been a long day, and we were pleased, yet very satisfied, to moor just before Gayton Junction.

Wednesday (15th August)

We’d been thinking about having a few adjustments done to Cyan once we got back onto the canals. One of the urgent jobs was  Cyan’s drainage system. The waste from the kitchen sink, the bathroom sink, and the shower flows into a sump. Once the water gets to a certain level in the sump, the ‘Whale Gulper’ kicks in and expels the water into the cut. This has been such a pain, as every 6 weeks or so the sump has to be dismantled, and cleaned of grease and gunge that had built up. As you can imagine it’s not a job we look forward too. Plus it’s a pain (literally) for John to get on his arthritic knees to access the sump. There is also, with this system, the potential to flood the bilge should the ‘Gulper’ fail to work.

As we were across the ‘way’ from Gayton Marina, we made enquiries via a telephone call to see if they’d like to quote for the work. Unfortunately the guy who could help us was having a day off, and that he’d give us a call when he returned.

In the meantime, John was chatting to another boater about the work we wanted doing, and he recommended the boatyard next to Gayton Services (Grand Junction Boat Co). John walked to the boatyard, and after having a chat with the manager, we were booked into the boatyard on Friday to have the work done. They will be cutting two holes in the hull, one for the kitchen sink waste, and one for bathroom basin, so the waste from the sinks are drained straight into the cut. A pipe will be welded into each hole, and attached to the sink’s waste pipe. The shower waste will be connected directly to the gulper, and the water evacuated through the original sump hole.

Thursday (16th August)

We had a gentle cruise to Bugbrook winding hole where we winded Cyan, returning and mooring just before Gayton Junction.

Once moored, John dismantled panels in the bathroom so the boatyard staff could access necessary areas.

Friday (17th August)

We set off early on Friday as we were booked into the boatyard for 9:00 am.

As soon as we arrived we were direct where to moor, and the work was promptly started. All went to plan, with one snag, which is no big deal.

The bathroom sink waste pipe is now lower than the hole in the hull where the waste water will flow out. Meaning the water will not flow out through the pipe, water doesn’t travel uphill. The hole in the hull had to be 10 inches above the waterline for obvious reasons (we don’t want to sink), the hole was just on 10 inches. We’ve planned to have a cabinet made in the bathroom to support the sink, rather than the chrome pedestal we presently have, it’ll make better use of the space for storage purposes. This job now looks to be a priority. Presently the bathroom waste from the sink is draining into a bucket.

Work wasn’t completed until after 5:00 pm. After paying our bill to the boatyard, we pulled forward onto the sanny services to take on water, use the Elsan services, and dump our rubbish.

It was late for us when we finally moored at basically the same spot we were the night previous.

Saturday (18th August)

Time to get straight again. John ‘rebuilt’ the bathroom, and completed the project of installing new/extra LED lights in the bathroom. Trouble was, the bathroom ceiling fan came on automatically when the light was switched on. We don’t always need the fan, and it was decided that an isolater switch be installed so we could switch off the fan, and turn it on when needed.

Sunday (today)

We stayed put today, we’ve chilled, and I’ve caught up with our blog. This morning we picked about a kilo of blackberries for a pie, and make a couple of pots of blackberry jam. The weather was rather windy this morning, and I doubt it would have been a great idea to battle with the wind by cruising. Lots of boats, especially hire boats, have passed us, but we’ve not envied their challenging wind conditions.

Tomorrow the weather looks to be a calmer, and dry.

We’ve planned our next journey which will take us through Braunston, down the Oxford, and onto the Coventry. We’re hoping to call into Springwood Haven Marina on the Coventry where Steve fitted out our kitchen last Autumn. He made such a perfect job of it that we’d like him to build the new bathroom cabinet/sink unit. Hopefully he’ll be able to fit us in quite soon, then we’ll be on our way again. Down the Coventry, turning right at Fradley Junction, through the Trent & Mersey…. and onto Crick down the Leicester Arm of the Grand Union…. and who knows where after that!

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